ksmith: (teashop)

Been here since yesterday. A long weekend writers retreat with a few other, well, writers. Writing exercises, brainstorming, business talk. More on the exercises in a few days, when I am home and have digested the results. It’s been an interesting process so far, though.

We are staying in a place with kitchenettes in the rooms, so we bought groceries and are doing most of our own cooking. I thought I would miss eating out, but I am finding I don’t. Except we did have high tea at the Drake today because that is one of the things one does when one is in Chicago and has the chance.

The weather has finally, finally been lovely. Coolish because we are near the lake, but sunny and dry. It’s even supposed to warm up as the weekend continues. The long-awaited spring one hears about in song and fable.

Mirrored from Kristine Smith.

ksmith: (me)

Some of the shots that Libby Bulloff took during my Seattle visit arrived today. Here are a couple, color and b/w of the same image, taken in front of the EMP Museum:

Mirrored from Kristine Smith.

ksmith: (Default)
Happiness is a royalty check, be it ever so humble...
ksmith: (Default)
Happiness is a royalty check, be it ever so humble...
ksmith: (balance_books)
So Eos will be changing its name:

HarperCollins is to rebrand its US imprint Eos Books as Harper Voyager and will merge its lists with the Voyager imprints in the UK and Australia/New Zealand.
So now world English language rights can be contained within a single imprint.

The Voyager and Harper Voyager editorial leaders are executive editor Diana Gill in the US, editorial director Emma Coode in the UK (working with publishing director Jane Johnson), and associate publisher Stephanie Smith in Australia.
The Eos imprint will make its official change to Harper Voyager in January 2011.
ksmith: (balance_books)
So Eos will be changing its name:

HarperCollins is to rebrand its US imprint Eos Books as Harper Voyager and will merge its lists with the Voyager imprints in the UK and Australia/New Zealand.
So now world English language rights can be contained within a single imprint.

The Voyager and Harper Voyager editorial leaders are executive editor Diana Gill in the US, editorial director Emma Coode in the UK (working with publishing director Jane Johnson), and associate publisher Stephanie Smith in Australia.
The Eos imprint will make its official change to Harper Voyager in January 2011.
ksmith: (balance_books)
Editors on Twitter seemed to really enjoy this.
ksmith: (balance_books)
Editors on Twitter seemed to really enjoy this.
ksmith: (balance_books)
So the Amazon links have been scrubbed from my website. Still have links to Indiebound, as well as Harpercollins for all the e-bookage.
ksmith: (balance_books)
So the Amazon links have been scrubbed from my website. Still have links to Indiebound, as well as Harpercollins for all the e-bookage.

Happiness

Oct. 13th, 2009 06:24 pm
ksmith: (balance_books)
Unexpected e-book royalties.

Happiness

Oct. 13th, 2009 06:24 pm
ksmith: (balance_books)
Unexpected e-book royalties.
ksmith: (balance_books)
...here's a link to Strange Horizon's 2009 Fund Drive.

Another market do which I have never submitted. I do want to try, though. Someday, I will get my act together where short fiction is concerned.
ksmith: (balance_books)
...here's a link to Strange Horizon's 2009 Fund Drive.

Another market do which I have never submitted. I do want to try, though. Someday, I will get my act together where short fiction is concerned.

Well, damn

Aug. 5th, 2009 02:06 pm
ksmith: (sadness)
Baen's Universe is closing.

So much for the story I was going to try to sell them...

Well, damn

Aug. 5th, 2009 02:06 pm
ksmith: (sadness)
Baen's Universe is closing.

So much for the story I was going to try to sell them...
ksmith: (gimme a break)
Last night's dream was a new entry in the forgotten college class/forgotten convention panel category. I was shopping at a Walmart-type store when I ran into Kris Rusch, who asked me about my new book, which had hit the shelves THAT VERY DAY. She asked me what the title was, and I couldn't tell her because I had forgotten it. "Encore?" I guessed. "No, that doesn't sound right," she replied.

In addition to forgetting the title, I had also forgotten what name I had written it under and what the cover looked like. I didn't even know whether it was hardcover or trade or mmpb. The dream ended as we searched the book section in the hopes that something would trigger my memory.

I do know Kris Rusch. When I signed my first contract, the rumors whipped around that "Kristine Smith" was actually one of her pseudonyms--she let me know that she had received congratulations from friends about the new contract, and made sure that we were photographed together at a couple of cons so that folks would know she weren't me and vice versa. She also would never, ever forget any details of a book release. Of course, none of my other writer friends would, either. Only I would, apparently.
ksmith: (balance_books)
Someone has taken the iPod approach, with colors and such.

IMO, the "direct publishing" aspect will just fill the thing with junk--I'm sorry, but the need for editing will never go away--but it looks cooler than other devices. Still too expensive, but given how quickly the inventor went from conception to market, new iterations are right around the corner.
ksmith: (balance_books)
Someone has taken the iPod approach, with colors and such.

IMO, the "direct publishing" aspect will just fill the thing with junk--I'm sorry, but the need for editing will never go away--but it looks cooler than other devices. Still too expensive, but given how quickly the inventor went from conception to market, new iterations are right around the corner.
ksmith: (balance_books)
Interesting.

The numbers can sound much bigger than they are. Take a reported six-figure advance, Roy Blount Jr., the president of the Authors Guild, said in an e-mail message. “That may mean $100,000, minus 15 percent agent’s commission and self-employment tax, and if we’re comparing it to a salary let us recall (a) that it does not include any fringes like a desk, let alone health insurance, and (b) that the book might take two years to write and three years to get published. . . . So a six-figure advance, while in my experience gratefully received, is not necessarily enough, in itself, for most adults to live on.”

Assuming you get that much.

Which is why there are things like day jobs.

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