ksmith: (Default)
Are things still green in December--lawns, deciduous trees? Do leaves fall? Does anything brown? I know it can be rainy.
ksmith: (Default)
Are things still green in December--lawns, deciduous trees? Do leaves fall? Does anything brown? I know it can be rainy.
ksmith: (blue q)
Do you see kayakers or scullers in the bays and rivers this time of year?
ksmith: (blue q)
Do you see kayakers or scullers in the bays and rivers this time of year?
ksmith: (blue q)
The metal wedge-shaped things that you drive into logs in order to split them--do they have a name?

(Besides "wedge")
ksmith: (blue q)
The metal wedge-shaped things that you drive into logs in order to split them--do they have a name?

(Besides "wedge")
ksmith: (Peter)
By way of [livejournal.com profile] shadowhelm, via Facebook:

A beam of white light is made up of all the colours in the spectrum. The range extends from red through to violet, with orange, yellow, green and blue in between. But there is one colour that is notable by its absence.

Pink (or magenta, to use its official name) simply isn’t there. But if pink isn’t in the light spectrum, how come we can see it?



Rest of article here. I pondered how Jani Kilian perceived color as she hybridized, and wish that I had played with that a little more.
ksmith: (Peter)
By way of [livejournal.com profile] shadowhelm, via Facebook:

A beam of white light is made up of all the colours in the spectrum. The range extends from red through to violet, with orange, yellow, green and blue in between. But there is one colour that is notable by its absence.

Pink (or magenta, to use its official name) simply isn’t there. But if pink isn’t in the light spectrum, how come we can see it?



Rest of article here. I pondered how Jani Kilian perceived color as she hybridized, and wish that I had played with that a little more.
ksmith: (christmas tree)
Merry Christmas to them as do. To them as don't, I hope you're enjoying a day off.

For me, it's Day Three of "Kris doesn't have to write today yea yea". I have unearthed several months' worth of Vanity Fair and Harpers Bazaar and other magazines which need to be read. Filled a recycle bin with a two-foot stack of catalogs. I am now gearing up to start on the rump roast, which will be cooked thisaway. Yesterday, I baked lemon-ginger cookies, which I think came out very well. The only thing I will say is that despite what the recipe says about baking only until the edges are browned, letting them go longer, until they're light golden brown all over, won't hurt the final cookie and will, imho, improve the taste via caramelization of the sugars and all that. Still, a nice cookie that tastes like a sugar cookie with bennies.

In other news along the "Don't try this at home--whoops, too late," amateurs are getting into the bioengineering business:

In her San Francisco dining room lab, for example, 31-year-old computer programmer Meredith L. Patterson is trying to develop genetically altered yogurt bacteria that will glow green to signal the presence of melamine, the chemical that turned Chinese-made baby formula and pet food deadly.


Some of these folks call themselves "biohackers, innovators who push technological boundaries and put the spread of knowledge before profits." The pros and cons are discussed. Some say the freedom and lack of corporate and economic considerations could lead to important new discoveries. Others worry that lacking proper safeguards, an amateur could release a deadly organism that could cause disease or damage the environment.
ksmith: (christmas tree)
Merry Christmas to them as do. To them as don't, I hope you're enjoying a day off.

For me, it's Day Three of "Kris doesn't have to write today yea yea". I have unearthed several months' worth of Vanity Fair and Harpers Bazaar and other magazines which need to be read. Filled a recycle bin with a two-foot stack of catalogs. I am now gearing up to start on the rump roast, which will be cooked thisaway. Yesterday, I baked lemon-ginger cookies, which I think came out very well. The only thing I will say is that despite what the recipe says about baking only until the edges are browned, letting them go longer, until they're light golden brown all over, won't hurt the final cookie and will, imho, improve the taste via caramelization of the sugars and all that. Still, a nice cookie that tastes like a sugar cookie with bennies.

In other news along the "Don't try this at home--whoops, too late," amateurs are getting into the bioengineering business:

In her San Francisco dining room lab, for example, 31-year-old computer programmer Meredith L. Patterson is trying to develop genetically altered yogurt bacteria that will glow green to signal the presence of melamine, the chemical that turned Chinese-made baby formula and pet food deadly.


Some of these folks call themselves "biohackers, innovators who push technological boundaries and put the spread of knowledge before profits." The pros and cons are discussed. Some say the freedom and lack of corporate and economic considerations could lead to important new discoveries. Others worry that lacking proper safeguards, an amateur could release a deadly organism that could cause disease or damage the environment.
ksmith: (Default)
I have found a couple of good websites, but if anyone has a favorite resource discussing either clothing or the American English language circa 1836, they'd be appreciated.

Books too, even...
ksmith: (Default)
I have found a couple of good websites, but if anyone has a favorite resource discussing either clothing or the American English language circa 1836, they'd be appreciated.

Books too, even...
ksmith: (Default)
Any Seattle folks who reported a crime and had a uniformed officer come to their home, let me know please. I just have a couple of questions about procedure.
ksmith: (Default)
Any Seattle folks who reported a crime and had a uniformed officer come to their home, let me know please. I just have a couple of questions about procedure.
ksmith: (Default)
I'm just getting used to high-speed wireless. Now this.

Although the grid itself is unlikely to be directly available to domestic internet users, many telecoms providers and businesses are already introducing its pioneering technologies. One of the most potent is so-called dynamic switching, which creates a dedicated channel for internet users trying to download large volumes of data such as films. In theory this would give a standard desktop computer the ability to download a movie in five seconds rather than the current three hours or so.

The grid has already been used to screen potential drug molecules and design new anti-malarials. Once it becomes available to non-business users, the effects could be tremendous.
ksmith: (Default)
I'm just getting used to high-speed wireless. Now this.

Although the grid itself is unlikely to be directly available to domestic internet users, many telecoms providers and businesses are already introducing its pioneering technologies. One of the most potent is so-called dynamic switching, which creates a dedicated channel for internet users trying to download large volumes of data such as films. In theory this would give a standard desktop computer the ability to download a movie in five seconds rather than the current three hours or so.

The grid has already been used to screen potential drug molecules and design new anti-malarials. Once it becomes available to non-business users, the effects could be tremendous.
ksmith: (cillian_eye)
...and your employee file...

Is mind reading next? Researchers using brain scans try to predict a person's thoughts.

The Berkeley team, which published its study online Wednesday in the journal Nature, used a brain scan to find patterns of activity when people looked at black-and-white images of items such as bales of hay, a starfish or a sports car. When the people then looked at different photos, a software program drew on activity in the brain's vision center to guess which images they saw with up to 92 percent accuracy.

Other researchers have stolen glances at people's secret intentions and memories, and the new findings suggest that brain scanners could even reveal the elusive content of dreams.


"The Elusive Content of Dreams" would, I think, make a great title.
ksmith: (cillian_eye)
...and your employee file...

Is mind reading next? Researchers using brain scans try to predict a person's thoughts.

The Berkeley team, which published its study online Wednesday in the journal Nature, used a brain scan to find patterns of activity when people looked at black-and-white images of items such as bales of hay, a starfish or a sports car. When the people then looked at different photos, a software program drew on activity in the brain's vision center to guess which images they saw with up to 92 percent accuracy.

Other researchers have stolen glances at people's secret intentions and memories, and the new findings suggest that brain scanners could even reveal the elusive content of dreams.


"The Elusive Content of Dreams" would, I think, make a great title.
ksmith: (aerynpistol)
OK, the Japanese did it genetically. I did it with brain implants.

Kim Dae-soo, a neural genetics professor at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Seoul, who was not involved in the research, said Kobayakawa's research could explain further what fear is, and how to control it.

"People have thought mice are fearful of cats because cats prey on them, but that's not the case," Kim said.

"If we follow the pathway of related signals in the brain, I think we could discover what kind of networks in the brain are important for controlling fear."

ksmith: (aerynpistol)
OK, the Japanese did it genetically. I did it with brain implants.

Kim Dae-soo, a neural genetics professor at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Seoul, who was not involved in the research, said Kobayakawa's research could explain further what fear is, and how to control it.

"People have thought mice are fearful of cats because cats prey on them, but that's not the case," Kim said.

"If we follow the pathway of related signals in the brain, I think we could discover what kind of networks in the brain are important for controlling fear."

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